Neil MALLENDER

Neil Mallender - England - Test Profile 1992

Photo/Foto: George Herringshaw

Date: 30 May 1992

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    • POSITION
      Right Arm Fast-medium, Right Hand Bat
    • DATE OF BIRTH
      Sunday, 13 August 1961
    • PLACE OF BIRTH
      Kirk Sandall, Yorks, England.
  • INTERNATIONAL
  • England
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Neil MALLENDER - England - Test Profile 1992

 

Neil Mallender, the Yorkshire raised fast-medium bowler, came close to making his England debut while playing in New Zealand domestic cricket in 1984, but despite his impressive figures Tony Pigott was chosen as the emergency replacement for Bob Willis' team. In the end Mallender had to wait eight more years before he was called up to play against Pakistan in one of those years when selectors looked to experience rather than long-term team building. That summer of 1992 he was sharing the new ball for Somerset with Andy Caddick, who was still a year away from being qualified for England.

 

He made his Test debut on a responsive wicket in the fourth Test at Headingley, preferred on the morning to Devon Malcolm, and his 3-72 helped bowl Pakistan out for 172. By the second innings he seemed to feel in complete control, and took 5-50 to set up a six wicket victory. Conditions were less to his liking in the fifth Test at the Oval, and he got only two tail end wickets as Wasim and Waqar bowled Pakistan to a 10 wicket win. So white was his blonde hair that colleagues early nick-named Mallender 'Ghostie'. He played for Northamptonshire from 1980 to 1986, then played at Somerset before a brief return to the Midlands.

 

In 1984 he took 4-53 and 2-12 for Otago against England at Dunedin just days before the Christchurch Test in which a late injury to Dilley made an emergency replacement necessary. His victims included Fowler, Tavare, Chris Smith, Lamb and Gatting. He became a first-class umpire in later life. (Bob Harragan)